Plodasaurus Rex

Moving at only a slightly faster rate  than the glaciers that carved the Yosemite and Hoover Wilderness,  I just finished my first backpack trip of the season. I intend to get a bumper sticker to put on my pack for all those to read who zoom by me on the trail.  It shall read:  “Plodasaurus Rex”.  I plod on brightly and indeed get to someplace….eventually.

The Robinson Creek loop outside Bridgeport is a very popular trail though nobody would call it an easy one. But it is immensely rewarding in grandeur and serenity, weaving  the wilderness magic that at once challenges and calms and nourishes the soul.

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While getting my wilderness permit at the Bridgeport Ranger Station, these pack llamas were awaiting their hiking partners the same.

While getting my wilderness permit at the Bridgeport Ranger Station, these pack llamas were awaiting their hiking partners who were doing the same.

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Robinson Lake.

Robinson Lake.

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Heading toward Crown Lake.   Crown Point in the distance.

Heading away from Robinson Lake toward Crown Lake. Crown Point in the distance.

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A tree with personality.

A tree with personality.

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A granite Cathedral past Crown Lake on the way to Rock Island Pass.

Past Crown Lake on the way to Rock Island Pass.

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First light, second day.

First light, second day.

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Stayed the night below the switch backs that lead to Snow Lake and Rock Island Pass. Broke in a new 1.2 lb tent. Lighter equipment, happier knees.

Stayed the night below the switchbacks that lead to Snow Lake and Rock Island Pass. Broke in a new 18 oz. tent. Lighter equipment, happier knees.

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Hanging On.  Photo by Bruce Czopek

Along the switchbacks a ribbon of snow hangs on.

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Snow Lake.

Snow Lake.

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The wonderfully surreal, Snow Lake.

The wonderfully surreal Snow Lake.

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Several miles below snow lake and Rock Island pass is Kerrick Meadows  a norther border of Yosemite to the Hoover Wilderness.

Several miles below Snow lake and Rock Island pass is Kerrick Meadows, a norther border of Yosemite to the Hoover Wilderness.

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The smart persons approach to backpacking.  I definitely see this in my future. These are the llamas and hikers I met at the ranger station in Bridgeport.

The smart  approach to backpacking. I definitely see this in my future. These are the llamas and hikers I met at the ranger station in Bridgeport.

 

From Kerrick Meadows, it is a quick hop over to Peeler Lake, 4 miles down to Barney lake and 3.8 miles out to the trailhead at Twin Lakes.  Since I  bombarded you dear readers with too many photos already, you could see  photos of the rest of this loop in the archives under “Barney and Peeler”.  Click on any photo to enlarge.  Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Plodasaurus Rex

  1. How perfectly glorious, you’ve given us a fabulous 4th of July, and thanks. What a thrilling experience to wander through that quiet majesty. Great pack llamas, are the mules gone? I don’t think I knew about the Hoover Wilderness.
    I think it’s the second photo, what looks like an evenly split rock in the very foreground. I’ve seen such phenomenon, rarely, a residue from the Big Sur fire of 2008. This may be from the recent Yosemite fires, too, if they reached that far. And if so, there is so much green returning. Amazing how restorative the land is.
    Beautiful trip, hoorah for adventuring.

  2. Brilliant scenery. Good you could take the time to enjoy it.

    When I’m out, I mostly wear my tshirt with a large picture of a snail on it and the title; l’escargot. That says it all really. 🙂

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